Rug Hooking at a Glance

Source: Wikipedia.

Rug hooking is both an art and a craft where rugs are made by pulling loops of yarn or fabric through a stiff woven base such as burlap, linen, or rug warp. The loops are pulled through the backing material by using a crochet-type hook mounted in a handle (usually wood) for leverage. In contrast latch-hooking uses a hinged hook to form a knotted pile from short, pre-cut pieces of yarn.

A crafts person creates a hooked rug by pulling lengths of cloth, usually wool, through a woven fabric, usually burlap.
Wool strips ranging in size from 3/32 to 10/32 of an inch (2 to 8 mm) in width are often used to create hooked rugs or wall hangings. These precision strips are usually cut using a mechanical cloth slitter; however, the strips can also be hand-cut or torn. When using the hand-torn technique the rugs are usually done in a primitive motif.

Designs for the rugs are often commercially produced and can be as complex as flowers or animals to as simple as geometrics. Rug-hooking has been popular in North America for at least the past 200 years.

 

Designed by Jane McGown Flynn Hooked by Gail Becker

Designed by Jane McGown Flynn
Hooked by Gail Becker

Reproduction of antique rug in the primitive style.

Reproduction of antique rug in the primitive style. #8 Cut.

Example of a traditional hooked rug using a commercial pattern. 3/32 and 4/32-inch cut (#3 and #4 cut).

 

Contemporary geometric hooked rug.

Contemporary style hooked rug. Designed and hooked by Gail Becker in a #8 cut.

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One Response to Rug Hooking at a Glance

  1. Pingback: Rug Hooking at a Glance | ATHA Region 12

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